Gifts from God from the OT

Recently, I’ve been reading through the Old Testament because other than the Sunday-school basics, I’ve never had much knowledge of much of it. Here I am, someone who tries to live according to the Word of the Lord, never having read a good chunk of it. I figured maybe that should change.

It’s been a long, slow process, and I’m probably not going to finish any time soon, but I’m glad I’m doing it. I’m currently in Isaiah and to be honest, I haven’t had a great understanding of a lot of what I’ve read up to now. I’ve always been intimidated by the OT because I knew I wouldn’t understand a lot of it, but I decided I wanted to read it for knowledge of the content, if nothing else.  Much of it has been pretty over my head, but much of it has also been very illuminating, and God has spoken to me through this confusing, difficult part of the Word that has formerly been all too easy for me to ignore.

This journey began a few years ago when my campus ministry did a semester-long sermon series on Exodus. This opened my eyes to the importance of sacrifice in Old Testament law. It gave me greater understanding and appreciation for the sacrifice of Christ, and why his death and resurrection was the way the Lord chose to save humanity. Similarly, since then, my attempted studying of the OT has increased my appreciation for God’s immeasurable holiness and endless mercy.

Reading of the Israelites forsaking God, coming back, forsaking him, and coming back over and over and over again is exhausting. Chronicles and Kings tell of little else but who was king and if that king worshiped the Lord or led Israel in sin. How this must have broken God’s heart! And yet, because of His incredible, irrevocable love, He always forgave when they cried out to Him with true repentance in their hearts. Not quite so different from my own life. What my OT attempt has taught me so far is a deeper appreciation of the Lord’s mercy. All I can do is marvel in awe and humbly give thanks for what He has done and continues to do for me. It’s a hard thing to explain in words, but the Lord is continuing to draw me nearer to Him through this experience. I’m grateful for that. Though I lack an understanding of many things, God is true to his promise to “draw near to those that draw near to Him.” How blessed are we to serve a God who speaks directly to us and hears when we cry out?

Though I often get bogged down by the hard-to-get-through parts of the OT, I’m looking forward to continuing my “study,” and letting God speak to me regardless of my scholarly iniquities. I encourage anyone intimidated by the Word to trust that God is close to those who seek him, and remember that we are not supposed to know and understand everything. Indeed, He never fails to reveal Himself to those who seek Him.

Rachel Pozzo

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The Common Good–Megan Helbling

My favorite thing about Colorado is the warning signs of steep grades on the highways coming in and out of the mountains.

TRUCKERS! ARE YOUR BRAKES COOL AND READY? NEXT 5 MILES STEEP GRADES.

HANG ON TRUCKERS! YOU’RE NOT THERE YET. 7% GRADE NEXT 3 MILES.

CHAIN LAWS IN EFFECT! PULL OVER NEXT 2 MILES TO AVOID BIG FINES. BE SAFE!

Wouldn’t it be nice if all of life gave us these warnings?

HUMANS! TOUGH DAYS IN INTERNATIONAL NEWS AHEAD. STAY IN BED WITH YOUR COVERS PULLED TIGHT.

WOMEN! CATCALLER AROUND THE NEXT CORNER. PROCEED WITH CAUTION.

7% COST OF LIFE INCREASE IN 2019! START SAVING NOW.

I recently read an article about the common good, the thesis of which was essentially: no one gives a damn about the common good anymore. Yesterday, I stopped to read a note written on a napkin squished against the sidewalk. It read, “THIS WAS A TERRIBLE PARKING JOB. THINK ABOUT OTHERS MORE THE NEXT TIME YOU PARK”. In a world of anonymous individualism, it’s easy to feel like no one cares about anyone they don’t know the name of.

Here’s a poem by Louise Gluck:

You want to know how I spend my time?

I walk the front lawn, pretending

to be weeding. You ought to know

I’m never weeding, on my knees, pulling

clumps of clover from the flower beds: in fact

I’m looking for courage, for some evidence

my life will change, though

it takes forever, checking

each clump for the symbolic

leaf, and soon the summer is ending, already

the leaves turning, always the sick trees

going first, the dying turning

brilliant yellow, while a few dark birds perform

their curfew of music. You want to see my hands?

As empty now as at the first note.

Or was the point always

to continue without a sign?

Maybe the problem with working for the ‘common good’ (whatever the heck that means) is that it takes the innocent, vulnerable, foolish, naive belief that what is common is good, what is communal is good, and that even though she’s mostly failing, the idiot who parked next to you is actually trying to be good. With that kind of soft attitude in this hard world, you’ll be as vulnerable to being plucked off as a dandelion in damp soil.

But weeding is what makes the flowers grow.

New Year, New Hair by Emily Eldridge

I’ve never done much with my hair. I don’t even take a lot of time styling it most days, even though one of the reasons I always say I like having long hair is that you can do fun things with it. I’ve never dyed it, although I did want purple hair as a teenager. It’s never been shorter than my shoulders and I’ve never had any haircuts that needed more maintaining than the occasional trim of the ends – at least not since I had bangs in first grade.

At the start of the program year, some conversation that I don’t even remember made me mention that I liked the look of a side shave haircut (specifically on Natalie Dormer in the last Hunger Games movie), and then the thought stuck in my head, what if I actually got one? I approached the idea in typical “me” fashion, which means that I spent three months thinking about whether I really liked it enough to try, saving pictures on Pinterest, googling how to style and trim and grow out a side shave, and asking people around me what they thought, including making sure my workplace wouldn’t consider it unprofessional. And finally, at the very end of 2018, I did it.

It was a scary prospect, especially because I have social anxiety and don’t like situations like going to a hairstylist and asking for an unusual haircut. I was afraid I would get it done and immediately not like how it looked, but I decided that even if that happened, I wanted to have done it; I wanted to try something new. Hair grows back, after all.

I’m happy to report that I am now “edgy” (according to the woman who cut my hair) for the first time ever and I love it!

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Special thanks to my roommates for encouraging me, my boyfriend for going with me to get it done, and my parents for not freaking out when I surprised them with my new look!